Sunday, December 7, 2014

The Force Necessary Black Belt Test

Unarmed Combatives Black Belt, Level 10.



Hand versus hand
Hand versus stick
Hand versus knife
Hand versus gun





     Mission statement: We fight criminals and enemy soldiers with and without weapons, standing, seated, kneeling, or on the ground. Sometimes we take them prisoner. Sometimes we kill them. Sometimes we escape. Certain sports are ways to hone parts of these survival skills.

     Before you start reading the test list, here are my thoughts on how and why I constructed the test the way that I have. I did start with the test and worked backward. There are many quick-fix fighting programs on the market. Not that there is anything wrong with the idea, because sometimes that can be helpful, and that is indeed what I try to cover in my Stop 6 program. But I am concerned with the "older" or "old-school" concept of a more complete slogging and slugging it all out in a comprehensive, longer-term, depth-building progression. Where are those long-term-commitment courses? Well, there's mine.

      I say every week -

     "I will never tell you how to fight. We just get together 
and work out. In the end, it is your job to create your personalized little fighting system for yourself." 

     We live in that "mixed person's world," where everyone is a different size, a different shape, age, strength, different physical problems, etc. My job is to adequately expose you to numerous good survival options. You work with them, experiment with them, and either like or don't like them. Build your own thing. Remember, we live in a "mixed person's" of different sizes, shapes, ages, etc., world. Experiment. There are things your students may not like and/or cannot do like you can. And vice-versa. An instructor has a higher level of responsibilities. And don't confuse your hobbies with self-defense fighting. Don't impose your hobbies on people and further this confusion. Be clear as to what is or what isn't a hobby or a sport and in the big picture where it all logically fits. It can often fit together.

     My goal was to create a big system that is like a college-level study into fighting. I am sure that the term "college-level" is not the best term for this, but nonetheless, the overall concept is what I am shooting for. This covers the broad fundamentals of fighting survival, and it is not complicated, not brain surgery or rocket science. This is, in a very, very abstract way, like a black belt in "karate" and "jujitsu," (small "k" and small "j") combined, minus all the dogma and katas, etc. This, too, is not the best explanation either. It seems to me that many courses and instructors today are either doing almost classical or at least the "new classics," like sport fighting or these quickie or quicker solution courses. Who is doing the best of both in the best way? I hope my system does. That is a better explanation.

     In the somewhat shunned and/or ignored advice of yesteryear, they told us that getting a black belt was the very beginning of your learning process, not the end. The core foundation. Now you begin. This advice I do like. Armed with this Black Belt as an overall foundation, you should move on into specific subjects like one pursues a master's degree. Be it sport or whatever, you move on to specific areas. You will discover that I have constructed a foundation here for you to spring forward and create a base understanding of the big picture to help this goal. This is also the best time for the Stop 6 program materials because you are using skills you have previously honed through proper time and grade. Any time is a good time for the Stop 6, but learning the angst and depth of fighting is a major insight and help.

     In this modern world of mixed systems and certifications and so forth, why have a "corny old" Black Belt ranking, you might ask? Well, one reason is that I can. I have tested up in the blacks. But there is a business reason. I still think a goodly portion of the populace recognizes the term. Respects it. Asks for it. Looks for it on your office wall. For that reason, I offer it. If such a rank makes you feel uncomfortable, then just use the term "Level 10." Another reason is that it signifies a certain rite of passage. A ritual for yourself and others. I promise you I will make the passage worthwhile. Ask anyone who has done the whole test. Many people just lie down on the floor when they finish it.

     Boxing? Kickboxing? Kickboxing with takedowns? Takedowns with situational finishes? Yup. Nothing replaces this rough-and-tumble knowledge, the angst, practice, and the precious time spent doing it. It creates depth and savvy and numerous benefits. I am rather oblivious to the whole "combat sports" versus "RBSD" debates. I like to do the more simple and the obvious and support it with the best skill exercises I can find and dodge the dogma. That approach transcends the debate for me. (I still pick those little "sport cancers" that can get into your way.)

     I am not an expert in every aspect of this process. We use many sources and experts, and I fully expect you to use many, many sources to improve yourself. It is, as they say, your journey.


     For the test for the system, I cannot emphasize how very important the Who, What, Where, When, How, and Why Module is, as well as the Stop 6 Module. They are the skeletal applications of everything psychological and physical. They cover use of force, laws, all the popular preemptive tricks, counter-crime, mixed weapons, well, they are simply imperative.



In the Force Necessary: Hand! Course, one studies:
     The Who, What, Where, When, How, and Why Module
     The Stop 6 Module Maneuvers - which includes:
          "kickboxing footwork
          "obstacle course footwork"
          "basic ground maneuvers"
     All good strikes, standing and ground, and their counters
     All good kicks, standing and ground, and their counters
     Good variety of takedowns (which automatically include some joint cranking)
     Some kickboxing that includes takedowns
     Ground fighting and escapes from ground fighting
     How firearms and knives operate and are used
     How impact weapons are used
     Counters to knife attacks
     Counters to stick attacks
     Counters to pistol and long-gun threats
     The 125 Worst Case Scenario Combat Scenarios




Here is the actual FN: Hand! Black Belt Test
     Explain the Stop 6

     Explain the Who, What, Where, When, and How Module
     Satisfactorily complete the first nine levels of the course

The Striking  Review: Review and repetition sets on gear, standing, and on the ground

     Eye attacks
     Palm strikes
     Forearm strikes
     Hammer fists
     Punching - Jab
     Punching - Cross
     Punching - Hook
     Punching - Uppercut
     Punching - Overhead
     Punching - Combination feeds
     Elbows
     Body Rams
     Uses of the Head Butt

             All of these strikes will be done from:
                     * Sucker punch - "bus stop"
                     * From hands-up surrender
                     * Ready stance
                     * While being held
                     * While holding
                     * Ground top
                     * Ground bottom
                     * Ground side by side

The Kicking Review: Review and repetition sets on gear, standing, and on the ground of:
     The Front Snapping Kick
     The Stomp Kick
     The Knee
     The Thrust Kick
     The Rear Round Kick
     The Lead Round Kick
     The Side Kick
     The Mule Kick/Back Kick
     Kick Sparring

             All of the kicks will be done from:
                     * The "Bus Stop"
                     * Ready stance
                     * While held
                     * Ground positions


     Be prepared to demonstrate on demand some Critical Contact, Hand Speed, Flow, and Skill Drills/Exercises

Overview of the Mandatory SFC Big Takedowns and Throws. You have to know what each of these are and do them.
     - Battering takedown
     - Head twist takedown
     - Tornado throw and Half-Tornado-Push
     - Outer leg sweep, rear takedown
     - Inner leg reap sweep, rear takedown
     - Frontal takedowns
     - The big wrap and dumps
     - Wrist crank/arm torque takedowns
     - 3 finger crank takedowns
     - Reverse (back-to-back) hip throw
     - Rear pull takedown
     - Rear choke takedown
     - Wheel throw/bent torso
     - Sheonage-style Shoulder/Bent Arm Throw
     - Clothesline
     - Under-the-Arm takedown
     - Rear "Hammer Lock"
     - Front arm bar
     - Reverse bent arm bar
     - Over the shoulder arm bar/break
     - Foot/Ankle sweep
     - Tackles - and single-leg and double-leg picks and scoops

The 125 Big Worst Case Combat Scenarios
     These scenarios are not choreographed. They are freestyle. The better your partner? The better the test. The partner can, of course, and should wear gear.
     Several rounds of boxing
     Several rounds of kick sparring
     Several rounds of kickboxing
     Several rounds of kickboxing with takedowns and situational finishes

     8 combat scenarios vs stick attacks
     4 combat scenarios, you are knee-high, he is standing with stick
     4 combat scenarios, you are grounded, he is standing with stick
     4 combat scenarios, you are bottom-side ground, stick on top
     4 combat scenarios, you are topside, stick on bottom
     1 combat scenario, grounded, side-by-side versus stick
     1 combat scenario, interrupting a 3rd party stick attacker
     1 combat scenario, interrupting a stick quick draw, standing
     1 combat scenario, interrupting a stick quick draw, ground, bottom
     1 combat scenario, interrupting a stick quick draw, ground, top

     8 combat scenarios vs knife attacks
     4 combat scenarios, you are knee-high, he is standing with knife
     4 combat scenarios, you are grounded, he is standing with knife
     4 combat scenarios, you are bottom-side ground, knifer on top
     4 combat scenarios, you are topside, knifer on bottom
     1 combat scenario, grounded, side-by-side versus knifer
     1 combat scenario, interrupting a 3rd party knife attacker
     1 combat scenario, interrupting a knife quick draw
     1 combat scenario, interrupting a knife quick draw, standing
     1 combat scenario, interrupting a knife quick draw, ground, bottom
     1 combat scenario, interrupting a knife quick draw, ground, top

     4 combat scenarios vs pistol threats
     4 combat scenarios vs long-gun threats
     2 combat scenario interrupting a third-party pistol attacker

     8 combat scenarios vs unarmed strikes
     8 combat scenarios vs kick attacks
     4 combat scenarios vs bear hugs and clinches
     4 combat scenarios vs tackles
     4 combat scenarios, you are knee-high, he is standing
     4 combat scenarios, you are grounded, he is standing
     4 combat scenarios, you are bottom-side ground
     4 combat scenarios, you are topside, ground
     2 combat scenarios, grounded, side-by-side
     2 combat scenarios, interrupting a third-party attacker
     2 combat scenarios vs multiple attackers


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

     And that's the test. If you look good? If you look like you are winning? You got it. Every unarmed thing I teach fits into this test, in a part supported by skill drills like a piece in the puzzle. There is a method to my madness.

     Dropping in for just a short haul? We'll also do the Stop 6. But are you tough enough for the long- term commitment? Plus use everything you've already learned. It'll probably fit in somewhere. This is your route. You do this and from your experiences build your own personalized, custom fighting program.

     Of course, you can always just train for knowledge. This is about you, not me. What you do with it.


Email Hock at HockHochheim@ForceNecessary.com
Hock's webpage www.forcenecessary.com
Facebook Hock's CQC Group


Look over the whole Force Necessary: Hand! unarmed course on outlines and films



Outlines, DVDs, or downloads.

Click here: